Mikey Sabatella – A Life in the Day

                I think it’s important for me to preface this review by saying that Mikey Sabatella is an old, old friend of mine.  I mean, he’s really old.  Nah, just kidding, but I’ve known the dude for years.  You know him from his days in Limit Point, who graced many stages on many occasions.  You probably also know him for talking to your girlfriend or sister and nearly wooing her pants off with and ease you could only dream of.  I swear he made Franky Pant’s mom blush.  Bottom line, I like the guy and I’m glad to see this record come out.

                Next, let me say that what I’d love to tell Mikey that this album is absolutely fantastic and he should expect to become a huge megastar based on its inevitable worldwide success.  I’d like to say that this record will open all kinds of doors to international fame and countless reality tv shows that will simply follow Mikey around in his day-to-day life.  I wish I could tell him that he need only sit and wait for the Grammys and soda company endorsements to start rolling in.

                Unfortunately I can’t quite say all that.  But what I can say is that this album is, honestly and truly, a fantastic album.  It’s got tons of heart, catchy tunes, and a mellow yet rock sound that is uber-accessible to just about any kind of audience.  I could definitely see this record helping Mikey get quite popular, among a number of different audiences, from soft-rockers to coffee shop/singer-songwriter devotees to 16-year-old girls (long considered his most devoted following anyway, they love his hair). 

                Soundwise, imagine the voice of Mike Ness calmed down a bit.  Now imagine he’s playing an acoustic guitar.  Now imagine the music you hear is sort of Warning-era Green Day, definitely punk rock, but twinges of folk drums and slick keyboard work underneath.  Best example of this would be track 4, “The High Road,” probably my favorite tune on the record.  I’ve added that to the “Work Friendly” playlist on my mp3 player so I can enjoy it whenever I get the urge.  “Starting Over” seems to be some kind of eulogy to the end of one relationship and the beginning of a new one, one that seems to hold some promise for the future.  I love the simplicity of this song, just voice, guitar, tambourine and a somewhat ominous and low-key bass/drum line that hints ever so slightly at something I just can’t put my finger on. 

                As a promoter, I have dealt with countless (4,851) band members and I can say that all but maybe five of them can relate to “Always Alone.”  Those five are in Deicide, so screw them anyway.  It’s kinda tough to relate the emotion of it, but suffice to say that if you’ve ever spent a considerable portion of time away from friends and family, you will know what the song is all about.  Go tell it on the mountain, brother. 

                I gotta say, despite my overall admiration and positive feelings for the record, I found “Get Away” to be a bit out of place.  It seems like it should be more of a hard-driven song, with a bit more attitude and snarl to it.  Unfortunately it always seems about to break out into awesomeness, but just doesn’t quite get over the hump.  But don’t fret, just skip ahead to “The Sun” and the promise that Mikey will “take us right outta here.”  I assume he’ll be on a white stallion, sans shirt, with sunbeams bursting behind him.  Just me?

                Anyway, I’m trying to keep this sort of short, cause I’ve decided that long drawn out reviews do little to really tell what an album is all about or accurately portray what to expect.  I’ll just cut short by saying that this record is definitely worth checking out.  Cruise over to www.mikeysabatella.com to give it a listen and www.mikeysabatella.bandcamp.com to get a copy for your mom.  It’s not like you really have much better to do.  If you did, lord knows you wouldn’t be reading this sorry excuse for a blog.  Oh snap.

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